BC Vintage Truck Museum, Cloverdale, Surrey BC Canada

1937 MACK EQ

 

 

• The Mack truck company started at the infancy of the automotive world and the Mack Brothers started working for a carriage company before ending up buying the company.

• Founded in 1900 by Jack and Gus Mack, Mack Brothers Company produced it's first motorized vehicle in Brooklyn, NY.

• In 1905 the "Manhatten" was introduced and it's high seat over the engine offered great visibility and was easy to maneuver on the crowded streets of New York.

• The brothers were inventive and Gus holds the patent for constant mesh gears that helped inexperience driver not strip gears.

• The Mack's try working with steam powered and electric motor cars.

• The Museum's truck was the second year of the E series which replaced the series AB that started in 1914. The Mack EQ was available from 1937 to 1950 and 10,661  units were built.

• Engine: 6 cylinder "L" head 353 cubic inches. 121 HP at 2200 rpm. 270 lb.ft. of torque. Crankshaft was case hardened with 12 counter weights and ran on 7 bearings.

• Durability was key so it came with a reliable Oil bath air cleaner and over 7 gallons of cooling fluid.

• Transmission: 5 speed or 10 speed with constant mesh gears.

• Rear Axle: Dual reduction, full floating with available gears, 5.99, 6.54 or 7.19 to 1 ratios available.

• Brakes: Air actuated with 16"x3" front and 17.25" x 5" rear and a parking brake on the rear of the transmission.

• Bob King purchased this 1937 Mack EQ from Shell Oil of Vancouver in the late forties.

• ing used the tractor for only a short time before it was put into storage.

• During the restoration process, Provincial Museum staff removed the tractor's fifth wheel to convert the Mack into a flat deck.

• The current body design is typical of coal trucks used in the 1930's and 1940's, decks were often depressed along the centreline so the coal bags could be transported without tying them down.

• EQ's found popularity mainly in Logging and construction operations.

• 1910: Mack delivers the first motorized hook and ladder firetruck used by the city of Morristown, New Jersey.

• 1916: The Mack ACs are introduced. Ultimately, over 40,000 of these models are sold.

• 1918: Mack becomes the first manufacturer to apply air cleaners and oil filters to their trucks.

• Mack trucks earned the nickname "Bulldog" during WW I. when Mack's AC Model vehicle earned a reputation for their strength and reliability in military service.

• 1919: The United States Army conducts a transcontinental project using Mack Trucks to study the need for national highway systems.

• 1920: Mack Trucks are the first with power brakes on their trucks.

• 1922: Mack introduces first truck with drive shaft instead of chain 1922 Model AB

• 1932: While recuperating from an operation, Alfred Fellows Masury, Mack's chief engineer, carved the first bulldog hood ornament and received a patent for his design; the bulldog ornament has adorned Mack trucks ever since.

• 1938: Mack trucks is the first company to produce its own heavy-duty diesel engines.

• From 1941 to 1945, the combined armed forces of the United States, Great Britain, France, and Canada took delivery of 35,096 total vehicles. The combat "N Series" (NB, NJU, NM, NO, NR, etc.) accounted for 26,965 of the total.

• The Allentown bus plant (5C) built Vultee PBY Catalina flying boats as well as components for the BT-13 Valiant Trainer and B-24 Liberator Bombers.

• They also built trolley buses and Locomotives and rail cars until 1930. From 1951 to 1954 Mack also built Diesel forward control rail cars.

• 1940: L Model series introduced, continuing until 1952.

• 1950: The Mack A Model series of trucks is introduced, produced until 1953.

• 1953: The Mack B Model series of trucks is introduced. 127,786 produced until 1966.

• 1966: The RL (for R-Western) model built at Hayward, California until 1981.

• 1966: Mack begins production at its assembly plant in Oakville, Ontario, Canada. The facility closed in 1993.

•  The Mack Company turned out its 1,000,000th vehicle in 1986, celebrating over 80 years of quality production.

• 1990: Mack Trucks becomes a wholly owned subsidiary of Renault Véhicules Industriels when remaining publicly traded shares acquired at $6.25 per share.

• 2001: Mack together with Renault Véhicules Industriels becomes part of AB Volvo of Sweden, the parent company Renault S. A. receives a 20% stake in the combined company.

• 2006: Mack has a record sale year.

 

 

 

 

Specs:

Wheelbases:176", 194" 212"

Engine: 6 cylinder "L" head 353 cubic inches. 121 HP at 2200 rpm. 270 pound feet of torque. Crankshaft was case hardened with 12 counter weights and ran on 7 bearings.

Oil bath air cleaner, over 7 gallons of cooling fluid and 21 gallon fuel tank.

Transmission: 5 speed or 10 speed with constant mesh gears.

Rear Axle: Dual reduction, full floating with available gears, 5.99, 6.54 or 7.19 to 1

Brakes: Air actuated with 16"x3" front and 17.25" x 5" rear and a parking brake on the rear of the transmission.

Frame: Pressed Carbon steel 9 1/16" by 3 1/4"

Bob King purchased this 1937 Mack EQ from Shell Oil of Vancouver in the late forties. King used the tractor for only a short time before it was put into storage. During the restoration process, Provincial Museum staff removed the tractor's fifth wheel to convert the Mack into a flat deck. The current body design is typical of coal trucks used in the 1930's and 1940's, decks were often depressed along the centreline so the coal bags could be transported without tying them down.

The 6 cylinder 90 horsepower Mack has a 5 speed transmission  with double reduction differential. Although designed for urban use, EQ's found popularity mainly in Logging and construction operations.

Mack trucks earned the nickname "Bulldog" during WW I. when Mack's AC Model vehicle earned a reputation for their strength and reliability in military service. The actual Bulldog mascot was designed in 1932 and has adorned every Mack truck since.

 

 

The Mack Company turned out its 1,000,000th vehicle in 1986, celebrating over 80 years of quality production.

The Museum's truck was the second year of the E series which replaced the series AB that started in 1914. The Mack EQ was available from 1937 to 1950 and 10,661  units were built.

DE 1939-1942 2,164

EB 1936-1941 134

EC 1936-1941 123

ED 1938-1944 2,686

EE 1938-1950 9,719

EF 1938-1951 13,783

EG 1938-1950 7,349

EH 1936-1950 31,539

EJ 1937-1938 762

EM 1937-1943 1,584

EQ 1937-1950 10,661

ER 1936-1941 359

ES 1938-1940 75

ETX 1950-1950 50

78,824 TOTAL

 

 

The Mack truck company started at the infancy of the automotive world and the Mack Brothers started working for a carriage company before ending up buying the company.

Founded in 1900 by Jack and Gus Mack, Mack Brothers Company produced it's first motorized vehicle in Brooklyn, NY. In 1905 the "Manhatten" was introduced and it's high seat over the engine offered great visibility and was easy to maneuver on the crowded streets of New York. The brothers were inventive and Gus holds the patent for constant mesh gears that helped inexperience driver not strip gears and Jack invented the "selective" feature that allowed drivers to shift directly from high to low gears without going through the mid range.

They also built trolley buses and Locomotives and rail cars until 1930. From 1951 to 1954 Mack also built Diesel forward control rail cars.

 

 

The present day company has very good website with a full history of the Mack Brothers and there products. Here are some of the highlights from it and other online sources.

1890: John M. ("Jack") Mack gets a job at Fallesen & Berry, a carriage and wagon company in Brooklyn, New York.

1893: John Mack and his brother, Augustus F. ("Gus") Mack, buy the company John worked for.

1894: A third Mack brother, William C. Mack, joins his brothers in the company's operations. The Macks try working with steam powered and electric motor cars.

1900s: Inspired by Orville and Wilbur Wright, Willis Carrier and Henry Ford's inventions, John Mack has a vision of producing heavy duty trucks and engines.

1900: The Macks open their first bus manufacturing plant. The "Mack bus", ordered by a sightseeing company, is delivered.


1902: The Mack Brothers Company established in New York


1905: Allentown selected as the home of main manufacturing operations, and headquarters. A fourth Mack brother, Joseph Mack, becomes a stockholder. Mack begins making rail cars and locomotives.


1909: A junior model 1-1/2 ton truck is introduced.


1910: The "Manhattan" trucks are since known as "Mack" trucks. Charles Mack, a fifth Mack brother, joins the company.


1910: Mack delivers the first motorized hook and ladder firetruck used by the city of Morristown, New Jersey.

 

1911: The Saurer Motor Truck Company, merged with the Mack Brothers Motor Car Company of Allentown, , to form the International Motor Truck Company (IMTC). IMTC would continue to make and sell trucks using the Saurer name until
1918.


1914: The Mack ABs are introduced


1916: The Mack ACs are introduced. Ultimately, over 40,000 of these models are sold.

World War I: Mack delivers over 6,000 trucks, both to the United States and Britain's military. A legend surfaces that British soldiers would call for Mack Bulldogs to be sent when facing adversity.


1918: Mack becomes the first manufacturer to apply air cleaners and oil filters to their trucks.

1919: The United States Army conducts a transcontinental project using Mack Trucks to study the need for national highway systems.


1920: Mack Trucks are the first with power brakes on their trucks.


1922: The company name is changed to Mack Trucks, Inc. The bulldog is accepted as the company's corporate symbol.


1922: Mack introduces first truck with drive shaft instead of chain 1922 Model AB


1932: While recuperating from an operation, Alfred Fellows Masury, Mack's chief engineer, carved the first bulldog hood ornament. Masury applied for and received a patent for his design; the bulldog ornament has adorned Mack trucks ever since.


1933: Mack Trucks helps in the building of many American structures, including the Hoover Dam.


1932: The Bulldog starts to travel on the hoods of Mack trucks.


1934: Production of electric "trolley coaches" began, continuing only until 1943.


1936: The Mack E series introduced. Mack Jr trucks introduced.


1938: Mack trucks is the first company to produce its own heavy-duty diesel engines.


World War II: Mack trucks were used by the military in various capacities, and the company built many heavy-duty trucks to help the allied forces win the day. From 1941 to 1945, the combined armed forces of the United States, Great Britain, France, and Canada took delivery of 35,096 total vehicles. The combat "N Series" (NB, NJU, NM, NO, NR, etc.) accounted for 26,965 of the total.

The Allentown bus plant (5C) built Vultee PBY Catalina flying boats as well as components for the BT-13 Valiant Trainer and B-24 Liberator Bombers. More than 700 NJU (5-to-6 ton 4x4) models were in the hands of the U.S. Army by 1942. In 1939 & 1940 the French and British received several hundred NR4 and EXBU models. Mack Trucks ranked 63rd among United States corporations in the value of World War II military production contracts.


1940: L Model series introduced, continuing until 1952.


1950: The Mack A Model series of trucks is introduced, produced until 1953.


1953: The Mack B Model series of trucks is introduced. 127,786 produced until 1966.


1955: The D Model low cab forward city delivery truck entered the market. Access to the engine compartment was possible by the Verti-lift cab. The cab lifted straight up hydraulically, guided by a forklift style mast behind the cab. A total of 832 D Model Mack Trucks were produced from 1955 until 1958.


1955: The military M123 10 ton 6X6 semi tractor went into production. Developed from the NO, it would be the US Army's standard until replaced by the M911 starting in 1976.


1956: Mack buys the tooling of the Ahrens-Fox Fire Engine Co. and introduced the Mack C Model cab forward fire engine which was an Ahrens-Fox design and the first of the "Cincinnati Cabs" ( later built by the Truck Cab Manufacturing Co. an OEM vendor builder of Cincinnati, Ohio), that have been the staple of the American fire service to this day.


1959: The first aluminum rivetted construction COE (cab-over-engine) family of trucks is introduced: The G Model which had a short production due to a striking resemblance to the Kenworth COE and Mack having the F Model ready for production.[citation needed] A total of 2181 G Model


1960: City of Hamilton, Bermuda buys first Mack built diesel-power fire truck in a B Model Chassis.


1962: The Second of the COE (cab-over-engine) family of trucks is introduced: The F Model all steel sleeper (FL) or non sleeper (F) is the first of this family of models for Mack.


1965: Mack releases the Super Pumper System, to be used by the New York City fire department.[13] It would help put out 2,200 fires.


1965: The R Model Series introduced, to replace the B Model Series. Some R series models continue in production until 2005.


1966: The RL (for R-Western) model built at Hayward, California until 1981.

 

1966: Mack begins production at its assembly plant in Oakville, Ontario, Canada. The facility closed in 1993.


1967: The CF model Fire Engine introduced, replacing the C model. The CF was a cab forward adaptation of the cab over style commercial "F" Model cab.[14]

 

1969: Mack patents the cab air suspension.

 

1979: Renault buys 10% of Mack Trucks, Inc.


1990: Mack Trucks becomes a wholly owned subsidiary of Renault Véhicules Industriels when remaining publicly traded shares acquired at $6.25 per share.


1990: Fire Apparatus production ends.

 

2001: Mack together with Renault Véhicules Industriels becomes part of AB Volvo of Sweden, the parent company Renault S. A. receives a 20% stake in the combined company.

2000: Mack builds 100 limited edition Visions with black paint and custom gold stripes and stainless badges for the 100th anniversary

2006: Mack has a record sale year.


More Info found on these wesites
https://www.macktrucks.com/about-mack/museum/mack-history/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mack_Trucks

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oil bath air cleaner, over 7 gallons of cooling fluid and 21 gallon fuel tank.

The 6 cylinder 90 horsepower Mack has a 5 speed transmission  with double reduction differential. Although designed for urban use, EQ's found popularity mainly in Logging and construction operations.

Mack trucks earned the nickname "Bulldog" during WW I. when Mack's AC Model vehicle earned a reputation for their strength and reliability in military service. The actual Bulldog mascot was designed in 1932 and has adorned every Mack truck since.

The Mack truck company started at the infancy of the automotive world and the Mack Brothers started working for a carriage company before ending up buying the company.

1900s: Inspired by Orville and Wilbur Wright, Willis Carrier and Henry Ford's inventions, John Mack has a vision of producing heavy duty trucks and engines.