BC Vintage Truck Museum, Cloverdale, Surrey BC Canada

1935 Dodge K52 Airflow

 

The first Dodge K52 Airflow was produced in December 1934,

ushering in a brief "Streamline" era in it's production. Between 1934 and 1939, Airflows were built, of which were made for the Standard Oil Company, based in New Jersey and California




Standard 'Oil established British Columbia operations in

1935. In that same year, a K52 Airflow was driven from California to Begg Motors, a Vancouver Chrysler dealer, and purchased by Standard Oil representatives on August 14, 1935





The 6 cylinder, 100 horsepower K52, with 1275 gallon fuel capacity, remained on the job six days a week delivering gasoline to local Chevron stations from 1935-1945.


 

In 1945, a Federal truck replaced the Airflow on Standard's delivery route. The Airflow tank was removed from the Dodge and temporarily placed on the 'Federal. When a permanent tank was installed, the original Airflow tank was disposed of and has never been recovered.

Bob King purchased the Airflow from standard Oil in 1947 and  it was put into storage. Except for the missing tank,  Provincial Museum staff carried out a complete restoration between 1575 and 1977. 

Available fro 1934 through 1940 by special request, the Dodge Airflow trucks used an unique waterfall grille to mimic the Chrysler Airflow car. Often fitted with streamlined tanker bodies and sold to oil companies such as Esso, Standard Oil and Texaco.

Under it's stylish body the trucks were pure conventional Dodge and over their run of approx. 260 trucks they were named K-52, LM-70, LM-71, RX-70 and RX-71 depending on their capacities and weight. The later RX70 and RX71 models,  had a 331 cu. in. (5,430 cc) engine with 100 horsepower

The tank bodies were built by Garwood Industries and Heil Co. of Milwaukee, Wis and two bodies were built for Schlitz Brewing Company by Barkow Co., of Milwaukee



Compartments behind and ahead of the fender skirts gave the Texaco trucks some trunk space.



 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dodge_Airflow_truck

https://ateupwithmotor.com/model-histories/chrysler-desoto-airflow-history/6/

http://theoldmotor.com/?p=143611

 

 

1935 Dodge K52 Airflow

 

The first Dodge K52 Airflow was produced in December 1934,

ushering in a brief "Streamline" era in it's production. Between 1934 and 1939, Airflows were built, of which were made for the Standard Oil Company, based in New Jersey and California




Standard 'Oil established British Columbia operations in

1935. In that same year, a K52 Airflow was driven from California to Begg Motors, a Vancouver Chrysler dealer, and purchased by Standard Oil representatives on August 14, 1935





The 6 cylinder, 100 horsepower K52, with 1275 gallon fuel capacity, remained on the job six days a week delivering gasoline to local Chevron stations from 1935-1945.


 

In 1945, a Federal truck replaced the Airflow on Standard's delivery route. The Airflow tank was removed from the Dodge and temporarily placed on the 'Federal. When a permanent tank was installed, the original Airflow tank was disposed of and has never been recovered.

Bob King purchased the Airflow from standard Oil in 1947 and  it was put into storage. Except for the missing tank,  Provincial Museum staff carried out a complete restoration between 1575 and 1977. 

Available fro 1934 through 1940 by special request, the Dodge Airflow trucks used an unique waterfall grille to mimic the Chrysler Airflow car. Often fitted with streamlined tanker bodies and sold to oil companies such as Esso, Standard Oil and Texaco.

Under it's stylish body the trucks were pure conventional Dodge and over their run of approx. 260 trucks they were named K-52, LM-70, LM-71, RX-70 and RX-71 depending on their capacities and weight. The later RX70 and RX71 models,  had a 331 cu. in. (5,430 cc) engine with 100 horsepower

The tank bodies were built by Garwood Industries and Heil Co. of Milwaukee, Wis and two bodies were built for Schlitz Brewing Company by Barkow Co., of Milwaukee



Compartments behind and ahead of the fender skirts gave the Texaco trucks some trunk space.



 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dodge_Airflow_truck

https://ateupwithmotor.com/model-histories/chrysler-desoto-airflow-history/6/

http://theoldmotor.com/?p=143611